01/12/2022
Nutrition

Nutrition: What is healthy food? – 2022

nutrition

Nutrition: What is healthy food?

Healthy nutrition throughout life is the most important element in maintaining and strengthening the health of current and future generations, as well as an indispensable condition for achieving active longevity.

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Fit Facts | Food and Nutrition – 2022

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What is healthy food?

A healthy diet is one that promotes growth, optimal development, fulfilling life, promotes health and prevents non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer.

Healthy nutrition throughout life is the most important element in maintaining and strengthening the health of current and future generations, as well as an indispensable condition for achieving active longevity.

The rise in processed foods, rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles have now led to health-threatening changes in the dietary patterns of people around the world.

Today, people consume excess amounts of foods high in calories, fat, free sugars and salt, while at the same time critically low in fruits, vegetables and other types of fiber such as whole grains.

The exact composition of a healthy diet depends on individual characteristics (age, gender, lifestyle and degree of physical activity), cultural context, locally available foods and dietary customs.

Principles of healthy diet

  • Energy intake (calories) should be balanced with energy expenditure.
  • Daily consumption of 400 grams (minimum) of fruits and vegetables, in addition to potatoes, and starchy root vegetables.
  • Fat intake should not exceed 30% of total energy intake.
  • Saturated fat should be less than 10% and trans fat less than 1% of total energy intake. It is advisable to replace saturated fats and trans fats with unsaturated fats, and completely eliminate industrially produced trans fats from the diet.
  • Free sugars should make up less than 10% (50 grams or 12 flat teaspoons for a normal weight person consuming about 2,000 calories per day) of total energy intake, with reducing intake to 5% or less provides additional health benefits. Free sugars are all sugars added to foods or drinks by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, as well as sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and their concentrates.
  • Salt preferably iodized, less than 5 g per day (a teaspoon without top)
  • Alcohol – do not drink or significantly reduce its amount. There is no safe dose of alcohol for health (according to WHO).
  • Breastfeeding a child up to 6 months, at the age of 6 months to 2 years – breastfeeding in combination with proper supplementary nutrition prevents the development of obesity and other non-communicable diseases in the future.

Start changing your diet  to make it healthy

Eat a varied, balanced, healthy diet for everyone! Find out exactly what you can do to make your diet healthy.

Fruits and vegetables

Nutrition experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables every day (approximately 400 grams). It is this amount of fresh vegetables and fruits that has been proven to reduce the risk of developing many non-communicable diseases and supply the body with enough fiber.

  • Include vegetables in every meal
  • For a snack or as a snack, use fresh vegetables and fruits.
  • Choose seasonal fruits and vegetables
  • Eat as many different fruits and vegetables as possible, expand the range of familiar products. Give a second chance to turnip, pumpkin, broccoli!

Fats

WHO nutrition experts recommend limiting the intake of any vegetable and animal fats to 30%, preferably up to 10% or less of total energy intake.

In addition, it is strongly recommended to reduce trans fat intake to less than 1% of total energy intake and to replace saturated fats and trans fats with unsaturated fats, in particular polyunsaturated fats.

This will help prevent unhealthy weight gain and reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

  • Steam or boil instead of frying and deep-frying.
  • Replace butter and lard with vegetable oils rich in polyunsaturated fats such as sunflower, olive corn, safflower.
  • Buy dairy products with a reduced (1.5-2.5%) fat content
  • Buy lean meat, and be sure to trim off any visible fat before you start cooking.
  • Limit your intake of baked and fried foods.
  • Avoid pre-packaged snacks and foods (eg cakes, donuts, pastries, pies, biscuits, biscuits, and waffles) that may be high in industrially produced trans fats.

 

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